Day 14 -- Hanukkah
 
 
Task 1:  Have you had any miracles in your life?  (Kids are a given.)  Just enough change for tolls?  Just enough gas to get you to the station?  Been tragically late for a flight only to find the flight was even more tragically delayed?  Nothing is too small - share your miracles with us!
 
The only things I can think of involve babies and there two stories to be told. The first story is of my grand nephew, the $2 million baby, who was delivered when his mother went into labor at 22 weeks. That she got to the hospital in time, that the boy had the determination to survive against the odds, these are miracles. The second is my grandson, a miracle of modern reproductive science. Beyond these two beautiful boys, all else pales in significance. 
 
Task 2: Light 9 candles each representing something you’re thankful for (share a picture with us; sharing anything else is optional).
 
Eight days. Eight candles. The ninth is there as a technicality, so that we may fulfill the requirement of the cerebration that the lights not be used for any other purpose than to celebrate the holiday. We call it the helper candle; it does all the work while the others just sit there.
 
So, eight things. I am thankful for the riches and blessings I have been granted: for the gift of life, for the freedom to think and belief as I do, for my husband and family, for good health, for dear friends, for good books and the time to read them, for the beauty in the world both natural and man-made and last but not least for bookish blogging and BookLikes buddies.
 
Task 3: Have a donut – and let us share it via a photo. Homemade donuts and shared recipes encouraged … but any donut will do just fine.
 
Okay, you have a donut but I'm having latkes.
 
 
Task 4: A miracle crucial to Hanukkah is the Miracle of the cruse of oil, which concerns a jug of oil that (ostensibly) only contained enough oil for a single day, but miraculously turned out to last all of eight days. – Miracles aside, tell us: Have you ever experienced that something you had bought or you owned lasted a lot longer than anticipated … or where you expected a shortage which then fortuitously didn’t occur after all?
 
 
 
 
Book: Read a book about light, miracles, characters who are Jewish or books set in Israel.  OR: Hanukkah commemorates the re-dedication of the second temple in the second century BCE; read the second book in a series or a book with the word “second” or “two” in the title.
 
 
I just finished reading Mark Helprin's Paris in the Present Tense, a novel about a modern day French Jew,  born in 1940 to parents who are hiding in an attic during the Nazi occupation.  I originally read it for Tolerance Day but it fits here as well.