Peregrinations

Peregrinations

 

Terse and to the point!

No zombies. No vampires. No angels. No self-help. No horror.

 

 

Review
4 Stars
Re-read!!!
Alexander Hamilton - Ron Chernow

It has been a couple of years since I read this and it is time to read it again.

 

How long has it been? Since before I joined BookLikes!

Free on Audible
The Home Front: Life in America During World War II - Martin Sheen, Audible Original

I'm not sure of the details of this offer--how long, who can cash in on the deal, etc., -- but currently Audible is offering this title for free. I haven't listened to it and have no idea if it is any good, but it's free.

Audible Sale Pile
American Ulysses: A Life of Ulysses S. Grant - Ronald C. White Jr., Arthur Morey Secretariat - William Nack, Grover Gardner The Odessa File - Frederick Forsyth, Frederick Davidson

I love shopping the sale pile. I found a bunch there that I already owned and three more to add to my library. This will keep me going for a while, don't you think. 

Not recommended at all
Murder Most Frothy - Cleo Coyle, Rebecca Gibel

The sheer stupidity of the main character is driving me crazy. I only continue to read it because I paid for it! Who walks into the ocean in the dead of night following the bad guy who is swimming back to his boat? Can believe she wasn't heard. Can't believe that she was able to swim the distance described. He was wearing flippers and a wetsuit; can't believe she got as close to his boat as she did. This is definitely the last of this series for me.

Filched From Facebook --Again!

Two-for-one on Audible this week
Latte Trouble - Cleo Coyle, Rebecca Gibel Murder Most Frothy - Cleo Coyle A Man of Some Repute: A Very English Mystery, Book 1 - Elizabeth Edmondson, Michael Page 4:50 From Paddington - Agatha Christie, Emilia Fox 13 Things That Don't Make Sense: The Most Baffling Scientific Mysteries of Our Time - Michael Brooks, James Adams The Stranger - Albert Camus, Jonathan Davis

At first I thought I wouldn't find anything in the sale pile but they had a whole category of cozy mysteries and I was able to fill my basket with some cozy reads--and some not so cozy reads like The Stranger and a title from The Flat Book Club list of possible reads. Now I will have plenty to keep me occupied.

Filched From Facebook

Reblogged
Welcome to The Flat Book Society

So the votes are in and tabulated and we're now officially 

The Flat Book Society!  Anyone interested in low-stress science (no dry, academic tomes here!) is welcome to join us.

 

A few points:

 

There will be a new group read once every other month, starting September 1st.

 

Books will be voted on by the group.

 

I have created a voting list to get us started, culled from the list Themis-Athena so very generously put together from the groups suggestions.  These are the top 10 books people indicated interest in reading.

 

Any member of the group can add books to this list.  Books must be non-fiction and the main subject must be Science.  Please do not add self-help or psychology books.  Please note that the BookLikes system assumes if you're adding a book, you're voting for it, so your vote will automatically be recorded for any book you add.

 

Any member can vote for any number of books, so don't think of this as a one-time vote for your favourite.  Vote for all the books you think you'd be interested in reading as part of the group.

 

I'll use the two books that receive the most votes by August 15th to create the first two club reads.  These will be our group reads for September and November.

 

The voting list will remain in place indefinitely, so as you find books that look like they might be of interest to the group, please add them.  (Chosen books will be rolled off the list.)

 

Please let me know if you have any questions I didn't cover here.  I've tried to make sure every book on the voting list has a summary in place, so please look over them and choose your poison!  

Reblogged from Murder by Death
The Skeptic's Guide to American History - Mark A. Stoler

The Iconoclast's Guide to American History. Well done but there was one thing that drove me nuts listening to this series of lectures. This guy sounds exactly like the campaign director character played by the late Ron Silver on The West Wing--same accent, same pacing, same stridency.

 

It is a good series of lectures that points out everything that we don't learn in school and all that we tend to forget about the events of American History as we move further away from them and start to paint these events with the brush of modernity.

I'm sure you will all agree

 

 

Privacy, Property, and Free Speech: Law and the Constitution in the 21st Century - Jeffrey Rosen

I'm just a couple of lectures in and I can tell that this discussion of privacy and property in the 21st century is going to leave me feeling angry and violated. I can't decide whether to do it all in one gulp and get it over with or to listen to one lecture at a time spread over many, many days.

Review
4 Stars
From the Ancient Greeks to the Moon
History's Greatest Voyages of Exploration - Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius

I remember "the explorers" as being a big thing that was taught in my school system in elementary school and we dutifully learned all the names of the European explorers and where they went, etc. My goodness, we were parochial in our approach to history. So, what was fascinating for me was the scope of these lectures. They went back further into history, covering the ancient Greeks, and they were more global, not limited to European white males. Each lecture covered one explorer or exploration telling the story of the exploration and then commenting on its significance, why it was a pivotal moment human history.

Review
4 Stars
Long but pertinent
An Economic History of the World since 1400 - Donald J. Harreld

It was a long haul but really not that difficult to follow and since he spends a lot of time talking about the world economy in the 20th and 21st centuries actually quite helpful in helping me understand the world I live in--just don't ask me to recap anything that I have just listened to!

 

The lecturer is well-spoken and knowledgeable, so it isn't at all hard to sit through all 48 lectures. Some of the lecturers like to dazzle you with their brilliance and flaunt their immense working vocabularies; Herreid has parked his ego at the door and in doing so, is able to present a huge among of information in a relatively short amount of time, clearly and concisely--and without boring you to death.

Out of My Comfort Zone
The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's New World - Andrea Wulf, David Drummond

I've never done a buddy read or joined a book club before, so this is new territory for me. I started listening about an hour ago and so, far, I'm enjoying the book and the experience. Still, I'm not quite sure how all of this works, but I'm sure I'll figure it out.

 

I will say that this is a very interesting read considering that I just finished listening to a Great Courses lecture series on the Industrial Revolution. There is a certain amount of overlap in the two discussions.

How many of us reread?

That was a question asked on my FB Georgette Heyer group and here was my reply. I want to save it and it will be easier to find here than on FB.

 

Re-read? It is my middle name!! Over half my reading is re-reads. I re-read all the GH, Dick Francis and Nevil Shute in my library in alphabetical order at least once a year. Between new books and my favorite three, I troll my Audible library for titles that I feel like reading again. I so prefer my old friends to most of the current writings. I have such a lousy memory that it is almost like reading a new book except that I know in advance that I already like it.

I am taking a bow!!!

 

Today is July 7, 2017, the 188th day of the year, just a smidgen more than half of the year is over and I am CELEBRATING.

 

As of yesterday, I have met my BL reading goal of 100 books. Last year it took me until September to reach this point. I am now 30 books short of what I consider the minimum books I wish to read and 86 shy of what I read last year. Will I make it? Stay tuned!!

 

My first hundred books includes 42 new titles, 9 Great Courses, 4 History titles and a couple of bucket list items (like the Illiad and the Odyssey). The last month or so, I have been on a re-read jag and I am just ripping a hole in my annual re-read cycle of Georgette Heyer, Dick Francis and Nevil Shute. I have 8 Great Courses and a couple of new titles waiting to download to my iPod but I have been super lazy and clinging to old friends for easy entertainment. There is a lot to look forward to in the second half of the year.